Supporting the Workforce

Workforce Values

What is required by Plan 21-24?

There will be a national values-based recruitment and workforce development framework in place and adhered to by all organisations and professions involved in supporting children and their families.

What has The Promise Scotland heard so far?

Engagement was focused on the critical need to uphold the UNCRC and #KeepThePromise through a skilled, motivated, trauma-informed and resilient workforce which is key to developing trust and building supportive relationships with children and families.

There was no reduction in the commitment to a compassionate decision making culture for children and families, but many reported that the impact of the pandemic was profound in being able to create and sustain a culture that can confidently manage a reflective approach to risk.

The importance of having shared values and understanding across disciplines was acknowledged, with many identifying values-based recruitment as a current focus. However, it was also recognised that this is not always straightforward.

Children’s Services Planning Partnerships are critical places to drive leadership and partnership approaches across practitioners, but there is still a need for improvement in shared understanding across different agencies and organisations.

Some organisations stated that they would value a refresh of the Common Core framework that had previously received good engagement across professional bodies.

What has been committed to so far?

  • The Scottish Government has committed to workforce planning around services and support for Children, Young People and Families that will follow a holistic approach to ensure continuity from historic and current policies to future national policy initiatives in health, social services and the delivery of national outcomes delivered by implementation of GIRFEC, UNCRC and The Promise.
  • SSSC will review all codes of practice to provide a framework to uphold a rights and relationships-based approach.
  • OCSWA will ensure all development work will include commitment to continued professional development to maintain competence in practice as legislation, policy and guidance changes. The promotion of anti-discriminatory practice, dignity and respect, and the recognition of unconscious biases will also continue.

Who are the lead organisations?

Professional Regulators have a responsibility to set the framework, but COSLA and the full range of care providers (independent, statutory and third sector) have responsibility for creating and sustaining a caring culture. Scottish Government.

Links, Next Steps and Assessment

Work is underway but does not yet appear sufficient.

The Promise Partnership programme has funded increased workforce capacity in many Children’s Services Planning Partnerships. The Promise Scotland will build on that network of support and capability, linking with work happening with SSSC and Scottish Government.

 

 

Trauma-informed

What is required by Plan 21-24?

Organisations that have responsibilities towards care experienced children and families and those on the edge of care will be able to demonstrate that they are embedding trauma informed practice across their work and within their workforce.

What has The Promise Scotland heard so far?

Trauma informed practice is discussed in every setting of care and across agencies and organisations with responsibility toward children and families, with many organisations acknowledging that they are uncertain about how to embed it as an approach.

This is particularly the case where there are stresses in supporting and maintaining a stable children’s workforce.

The National Trauma Training Programme (NTTP) was set up to develop a set of resources to promote and implement trauma informed practice in Scotland. Its focus will be upon the key drivers for sustainable change, including trauma informed leadership, staff and organisational wellbeing, shared power, workforce knowledge and skills and trauma informed organisations.

Several Local Authorities had comprehensive programmes underway to support trauma informed understanding across the workforce.

What has been committed to so far?

The National Trauma Training Programme will:

  • Build capacity for trauma informed practice through a newly established network of Trauma Champions. These champions are senior leaders representing the majority of local areas across Scotland and will be supported to help influence change across all sectors of the workforce through a programme of collaborative learning and leaders training  provided by the Improvement Service and NHS Education for Scotland (NES).

The Scottish Government has committed to the following timeline by March 2022 :

  • Development and roll out of trauma training resources to support Social Workers.
  • Development and delivery of tailored trauma training resources for people supporting care experienced babies, children and young people.
  • Development of a delivery plan to explore how trauma training can be incorporated into professional education routes and Continued Professional Learning (CPL) opportunities across all sectors of the workforce.
  • Collation and dissemination of good practice examples and case studies of where trauma informed practice has been successfully implemented.
  • Continued engagement with a range of stakeholders to ensure that the workforce, as well as parents and carers, have the confidence, knowledge and skills to support care experienced babies, children and young people who may be impacted by trauma.

Who are the lead organisations?

There are a number of organisations that have a responsibility for training and support around trauma. Those with lead responsibility are:

NHS Education for Scotland
The Scottish Government Children’s Services Partnerships
COSLA

Links, Next Steps and Assessment

Work is underway.

There are key links with outcomes in relation to Family Therapies.

The Promise Scotland will monitor progress, and scope whether there is work that could be developed alongside to consider the needs of care experienced children and families.

 

 

Ongoing Relationships

What is required by Plan 21-24?

There will be no blanket policies or guidance that prevent the maintenance of relationships between young people and those who care for them. Settings of care will be able to facilitate the protection of relationships that are important to children and young people.

What has The Promise Scotland heard so far?

Many organisations have reported that the publication of the promise allowed them to undertake a new approach to support relationships between young people and those who care.

There was widespread commitment for the upholding and protecting of relationships, with the need to ensure those who cared had time, space and support to continue to care.

There is welcome action but a need to develop a strategy with measures that can demonstrate shift in practice.

What has been committed to so far?

  • The SSSC will review its codes of practice by 2023 taking a rights and relationships upholding perspective on what needs to change.
  • The SSSC will work with Promise Scotland to drive new ways of communicating to the workforce and employers the important of relationships-based practice and values.
  • The Care Inspectorate have given relationships greater prominence in the new quality improvement frameworks that underpin inspections.

Who are the lead organisations?

The SSSC and The Care Inspectorate have responsibility for setting the framework, but the full range of care providers have key practice responsbility to encourage the maintenance of safe, kind relationships between children and young people and those who care for them.

Links, Next Steps and Assessment

Work is underway.

The Promise Scotland will work with SSSC to scope the development of relationships-based practice support, awareness raising with key markers of success that can demonstrate a shift in ways of working.

 

 

Workforce Support

What is required by Plan 21-24?

A new framework of support will be in place to ensure people involved in the care of care experienced children and young people feel valued, encouraged and have supportive relationships for reflection with high quality supervision and environmental conditions.

What has The Promise Scotland heard so far?

Across organisations there was a clear understanding and acknowledgement that the ‘care system’ is experienced through the people that work, volunteer and care, in and around it.

Local Authorities and Children’s Services Planning Partnerships consistently stated that the workforce is their biggest asset, but also had significant concerns about retention, recruitment and culture changes. Retention and promotion were highlighted as being particularly challenging in more remote rural areas. Improved succession planning to support emerging leaders was also noted.

The impacts of the pandemic on working conditions many staff had faced was also highlighted, reinforcing the importance of ensuring there is support to enable those staff to recover. 

Some Local Authorities are in the process of recruiting to posts specifically intended to support the wider workforce to coordinate activity to #KeepThePromise.

Police Scotland have developed an internal lived experience group of officers and police staff who are care experienced. This group will provide an all-inclusive view of policing services delivery for care experienced particularly looking to reduce stigma.

Much of this work in relation to this outcome aligns with work under workforce values.

What has been committed to so far?

  • As with commitments under workforce values, The Scottish Government has committed to leading workforce planning around services and support for children, young people and families that will work to support those who care.
  • The SSSC is reviewing all its codes of practice by 2023 that should have at its core the need to facilitate support for the workforce as well as framing the regulatory environment for practitioners.

Who are the lead organisations?

A significant range of organisations have responsibility for ensuring the workforce are fully

supported. Those with a key role are:

Professional Regulators Children’s Services Partnerships
COSLA
Scottish Government
SSSC
Police Scotland
Care Providers

Links, Next Steps and Assessment

There is work underway, but does not yet appear sufficient.

The Promise Scotland will monitor the work around the development of a workforce support framework, offering support and guidance as required.